The News Klippe

MAY 2001

EAST TENNESSEE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

and

TENNESSEE SECTION of the
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL GEOLOGISTS


In this issue...
ETGS/AIPG May Meeting
May Presentation
April Meeting Summary
Help Requested by the Wilderness Center
Where's Rightmire
ETGS Spring Field Trip
Contact Information

 

ETGS/AIPG MAY MEETING


EAST TENNESSEE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
and
TENNESSEE SECTION of the
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL GEOLOGISTS

ETGS/AIPG MEETING

Monday, May 7, 2001
11:45 am - 1:00 pm

Sagebrush Steakhouse
390 S. Illinois Ave.
Oak Ridge, TN


MAY PRESENTATION

USING RESISTIVITY TO DELINEATE THE FRESHWATER LENS ON
ANDROS ISLAND, BAHAMAS

Angela L. Adams
P.E. LaMoreaux & Assoc., Inc.,
Oak Ridge, TN, 37830, U.S.A.
aadams@pela-tenn.com

Abstract

The freshwater lens on Andros Island, Bahamas is an important source of potable water for its citizens and the more densely populated New Providence Island. Because of the possibility that fresh water in the aquifer is currently being depleted, it is necessary to observe the rate of salt water incursion in order to prevent salt water contamination of the freshwater aquifer.

Fresh ground water lenses in the Bahamas may be mapped using electrical resistivity surveys utilizing the large contrast in resistivity between the freshwater and saltwater saturated carbonate rocks that make up the island. On northern Andros Island there have been numerous studies in the past eight years completed in an effort to understand the thickness and continuity of the freshwater lens from Conch Sound through Red Bays and onto the western tidal flat.

Results to date indicate that there is a single continuous lens from Red Bays on the west to Conch Sound on the east. Salt water is upwelling in the well fields due to pumping, as well as in the Charlie's Blue Hole area due to karst solutioning. Because of over pumping the trench wells, the thickness of the freshwater lens has thinned under the well fields.

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APRIL MEETING SUMMARY

by Carla Sparks

The April meeting of the ETGS and the The East Tennessee Chapter of AIPG was held in Knoxville at Ryan's Family Steakhouse.

The upcoming Spring Field Trip was discussed during the last meeting. For full discussion on the field trip plans, see the Spring Field Trip article below.

Allan Jenkins presented information on the hydrogeology and modeling to support high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. Mr Jenkins discussed the local geology and hydrogeology of the area known as the General Separations Area that included the F- and H-Area tank farms. He also presented information on the tank physical parameters and addressed how a simplistic fate and transport model was used to guide the closure plan and performance assessment for the ongoing closure process. For a complete abstract, please see the April News Klippe.

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HELP REQUESTED BY THE WILDERNESS CENTER

by Carla Sparks

ETGS was recently contacted by Rudy Tekaucic, a representative of The Wildernes Center in Wilmot Ohio. He has requested the assistance of ETGS in creating a "Rock Walk". Mr. Tekaucic provided a good description of the Wilderness Center and their project. This information is presented below.

If you might be able to assist in this project, you can contact Mr. Tekaucic directly at:

Rudolph J. Tekaucic
email:
tekaurj@sssnet.com
Project Leader 10771
Corundite, NW (Home address)
Massillon, OH 44647
330-833-3573 (Home telephone)

 

I am requesting assistance, as a representative of the Geology Club of the Wilderness Center located in Wilmot, Ohio, from your Society.

Briefly, here are the facts regarding this request: The Wilderness Center is a non-profit institution dedicated to Nature Education, Wildlife Conservation, Natural History Research, and Community Service. The Geology Club, one of the several special interest clubs at the Wilderness Center, is dedicated to educating it's members and the general public about the world of rocks and minerals that they encounter daily. The Geology Club is establishing, as an educational tool, an outdoor "Rock Walk". This "Rock Walk" will consist of a circular display of rocks and minerals that will each be identified as to geologic age, composition, economic use, goegraphic origin, and donated source. The specimens will all be about one cubic foot in size and will consist of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic specimens. The sedimentary specimens will be mostly from Ohio however there is no igneous and metamorphic material to be found in Ohio, except for glacial erratics, that are not acceptable for the display.

Now for the assistance. We ask that you consider providing the following, in no particular order of importance:

We would be providing for all transportation of the material by having Geology Club members take home a "passenger" when travelling thru your area. We have a target date of mid-September 2001 for completion of the "Rock Walk" and have started to secure specimens.

Any assistance you can give will be greatly appreciated.


WHERE'S RIGHTMIRE

by Tony Tingle

As many of you know, Craig Rightmire is an active member of ETGS. On the 16th of March he began hiking the Appalachian Trail at Springer Mountain Georgia. His wife, Diane, e-mails his whereabouts to a few folks and the News Kikppe reports his geologic whereabouts for anyone interested.

According to Diane's last report, Craig is plodding north and has made it to Hampton Tennessee. Since the last News Klippe, his travels have lead him into three states, through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, across the Hot Springs Window, over Roan Mountain, and into Hampton.

Passing through the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, the Appalachian Trail crosses over Precambrian rocks of the Great Smoky Group, part of the Ocoee Supergroup. Rocks underfoot along the trail include the Elkmont Sandstone, Thunderhead Sandstone, and Anakeesta Formation. A little further up the road, the trail crosses a geologic window around the town of Hot Springs in North Carolina. The younger rocks exposed in the window are the Cambrian Chilhowee Group, Shady Dolomite, and Rome Formation. The overlying older rocks are part of the Ocoee Supergroup. A little further north, at Roan Mountain on the Tennessee/North line, Craig's geologic travels moved him back in time (and into higher-grade metamorphic terrain) to rocks of the middle to late Proterozoic. According to the NC Geologic Map (1:500,000 scale, North Carolina Geologic Survey, 1985), atop Roan Mountain migmatitic biotite-hornblende gneiss, biotite granitic gneiss and amphibolites are underfoot. (He may not have been looking at the rocks up there because the view of the surroundings are spectacular from the high balds on Roan) From the peak of Roan Mountian, the path moves downhill, into younger rocks, crossing the Chilhowee Group again, and into Hampton.

Keep Trekking Craig!

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ETGS SPRING FIELD TRIP

by Tony Tingle & Betsy Gorisch

Cast your Vote! Come to the Meeting at the Sagebrush and cast your vote for the date of the Next ETGS Field Trip.

Can't make the Meeting? Send your Vote to us at geofolks@worldnet.att.net. The proposed dates are the weekends of
June 9-10,
June 16-17, or
June 30-July 1.

Saturday will be spent on looking at the geology at roadside outcrops.
Saturday night (Optional Camping)
Sunday (Optional Raft Trip on the Ocoee)

Detials to be provided at the meeting. Summary of the trip is presented below. For full discussion of the planned route, see the April News Klippe:

The field trip of the East Tennessee Geological Society for Spring of 2001 covers a metamorphic traverse beginning with the chlorite grade rocks (lower greenschist facies) in Boyd Gap, at the head of the Ocoee Gorge, heading eastward and upgrade, generally following US Highway 64, and culminating with the granulite facies rocks cropping out at Winding Star Gap. The Winding Stair Gap rocks consist of a complicated assemblage of uniformly high-grade metapelites and meta-igneous rocks, including various schists, gneisses, an orthopyroxenite, and some migmatites. These rocks may be related to presumed Hayesville thrust sheet ophiolites (Absher and McSween, 1985). The area covered by the field trip comprises a portion of what has been termed the "Jefferson Terrane" (Horton et al., 1989), an allochthon lying between the Brevard fault zone (on the east) and the pre-metamorphic Hayesville fault (on the west), and extending further westward to the Boyd Gap location. It is composed of a highly complex collection of structures including folded thrust sheets, windows to underlying western Blue Ridge rocks, and occasional exposures of Grenville basement. The sedimentological and stratigraphic history of the area is extremely complex, and has proven difficult to interpret.

The stops on the proposed field trip represent locations of generally increasing metamorphic grade, from west to east. The traverse includes 9 stops, both east and west of the pre-metamorphic Hayesville fault, and on the Hayesville thrust sheet itself. One of the stops, at Ducktown, Tennessee, will include a visit to the Ducktown Basin Museum if time permits.

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CONTACT INFORMATION

 

EAST TENNESSEE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY (ETGS)
Post Office Box 6193
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6193
http://www.discoveret.org/etgs

President Tony Tingle The IT Group 865-690-3211 geofolks@worldnet.att.net
Vice President Your Name Could Appear Here NEED VOLUNTEER!!    
Secretary/Treasurer Loren Demaree Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc   loren.demaree@jacobs.com
Newsletter Editor/WebMaster Carla Sparks Tenera Energy 865-560-0354 (ext. 118) csparks@tenera.com
Field Trip Coordinator Mark Joop The IT Group   mjoop@theitgroup.com

Membership Committee
Jim Morgan ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller 865-481-3000 jmorgan@arcadis-us.com
Mark Joop The IT Group   mjoop@theitgroup.com

 

TENNESSEE SECTION of the
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL GEOLOGISTS (AIPG)

http://www.aipg.org

President, Chris Maner, Tenn Dept of Env and Conserv (TDEC), cmaner@mail.state.tn.us
Secretary/Treasurer, Ken Haislip
ETGS/AIPG Liason, John Hofer,
jhofer@theitgroup.com

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